B.C. legislation to repeal historical wrongs against Chinese-Canadians

SUNNY DHILLON, Mar. 07, 2017

The B.C. government will repeal 19 pieces of historical legislation that contain discriminatory provisions – acts passed between 1881 and 1930 that forbid employing Chinese or Japanese people. The province introduced legislation to remove the discriminatory laws on Tuesday. It identified the acts during a year-long review that stemmed from the province’s pledge to address historical wrongs against Chinese-Canadians. Read more…

British Columbia Premier Christy Clark (right) and Teresa Wat, Minister of International Trade and Minister Responsible for the Asia Pacific Strategy and Multiculturalism, arrive to speak at Vancouver International Airport in Richmond, B.C., on Nov. 21, 2013. The B.C. government will repeal 19 pieces of historical legislation that contain discriminatory provisions – acts passed between 1881 and 1930 that forbid employing Chinese or Japanese people.
(DARRYL DYCK For The Globe and Mail)

62 Years of State Racism Does Something to You

William Ging Wee Dere, 5 February 2017

In 2017, Canada celebrates its 150th birthday. Lesser known, it also marks the 70th anniversary of the repeal of the 1923 Chinese Immigration Act, which banned all Chinese immigration to Canada for 24 years. This Act, along with the Head Tax that was imposed on the Chinese starting in 1885, lasted 62 years of Canada’s 150-year history. While we celebrate, we are also reminded that the legacy of racist laws against a community continues long after the laws have been lifted, even at the highest levels of society. Over the years, I’ve tried to tone down my anger against the system, but when this powerful emotion swells up, I try to channel it into positive action. Read more…

William’s father’s head tax certificate