Meet East Vancouver’s original urban farmers

By CHRISTOPHER CHEUNG, AUGUST 10, 2016

Michaelina Teo has grown produce for many years, from mangoes in Brunei to the Swiss chard at her Renfrew home, but last year was the first time she ever won a prize for the sexiest squash. Read more…

Like many immigrant Asian seniors, Jason Lee and his wife, Jean, grow a colourful mix of eastern and western crops in their East Van garden. Photo Jennifer Gauthier
Like many immigrant Asian seniors, Jason Lee and his wife, Jean, grow a colourful mix of eastern and western crops in their East Van garden. Photo Jennifer Gauthier

Three Great Beef Noodle Soups, with Martin Yan

By LUCKY PEACH

Here is a completely unqualified statement that I dare you to refute: beef noodle soup is the ultimate comfort food. I would bet that a broth-y bowl of slippery noodles and falling-apart-tender beef brings fuzzy feelings to more people on earth than any other dish (save, perhaps, for a bowl of plain rice). Beef noodle soup appears in innumerable forms all throughout Asia (and beyond, if you count tortellini en brodo and sopa criolla and goulash and Campbell’s). There’s rich, sweet red-braised beef noodle soup in Taiwan, fragrant Vietnamese pho, beef udon and ramen, icy-cold Korean naeng myun—all delicious in their own ways. Read more…

DINER | Chef Douglas Chang To Open Ai & Om Knife Store On E. Pender Street In Chinatown

by Andrew Morrison, MAY 11, 2016

Vancouver cooks of every stripe – be they amateur, professional, or utterly hopeless – will soon have a chef-owned knife store to call on for all their edged-tool needs. Located at 129 East Pender Street in the heart of Chinatown, Ai & Om is being launched by chef Douglas Chang (formerly Bambudda, Sai Woo). His passion for hand-crafted Japanese knives is decades old, kindled in tutelage by a master of the art when he was a young chef de partie in New York. Read more …

Chinese Canadian Archive: From Chop Suey to Peking Duck

by Suk Yin, July 4, 2016

“Chop suey” translates as “mixed bits” and was a popular dish among early Chinese immigrants and Caucasian diners. Corresponding with the dynamic growth of various Chinese populations in Toronto, the variety of Chinese cuisine has grown dramatically and, today, we have a multitude of choice – from chop suey to Peking duck and everything in between – according to our preference. Read more …

Mr. Lee Hong's laundry, 48 Elizabeth Street 1912 Series 372, sub-series 55, item 43, City of Toronto Archives
Mr. Lee Hong’s laundry, 48 Elizabeth Street 1912
Series 372, sub-series 55, item 43, City of Toronto Archives

CHOP SUEY NATION

by ANN HUI, Monday, Jul. 04, 2016

About an hour-long ferry ride off the northeast coast of Newfoundland, where the frigid waters of the Atlantic Ocean crash onto a jutting granite shoreline, is the tiny island of Fogo – a place so remote that conspiracy theorists believe it to be one of the four corners of the Earth. And in a small village on this island – where wooden houses and clapboard sheds dot the shore like Monopoly pieces – is Kwang Tung Restaurant, Fogo Island’s very own Chinese café. Read more …

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: BEN BARRETT-FORREST/THE GLOBE AND MAIL/ISTOCK PHOTO
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: BEN BARRETT-FORREST/THE GLOBE AND MAIL/ISTOCK PHOTO