Food Films And Documentaries To Binge Watch Under Quarantine

By MICHELIN Guide Taipei Editorial Team, Mar 31, 2020

These documentaries, feature films and a talk-of-the-town Japanese TV drama offer a peek into the lives and minds of the world’s top chefs and their MICHELIN-starred kitchens.

There is no need to stare blankly at your four walls if you are staying home to practice social distancing. Whether you’re a movie buff or a serious foodie, these documentaries, feature films and drama series lift the curtains on the world of fine-dining and the workings of MICHELIN-star kitchens around the world, one sumptuous scene at a time. Read more…

David Chang pays René Redzepi a visit at Noma in Copenhagen (Photo: Still from The Mind Of A Chef)

5 Questions With Chef Susur Lee On The Future Of Chinese Cuisine

By Kenneth Goh, Michelin Guide Global, Aug 12, 2019

The Toronto-based celebrity chef, who co-helms the MICHELIN Plate Chinese restaurant TungLok Heen, shares his advice for young Chinese chefs.

Whenever celebrity chef Susur Lee travels, he keeps an eye out for that one good idea to bring back to Toronto, where he runs restaurants including Lee and Kid Lee. Things that have caught his attention can span from ingredients such as long black peppercorns from Cambodia to how a deboned chicken drumstick is served like a popsicle in a street stall in Qingdao.

Speaking to The MICHELIN Guide Digital during a recent trip to Singapore, Lee says: “I need that one great idea, be it from ingredients to a dish, and I enjoy making my rendition of dishes that I see overseas when I am back in my kitchen at home.” Read more…

The steamed White Sultan Fish with Crunchy Scales is one of the revamped dishes at TungLok Heen. (Photo: TungLok Heen)

China Institute Members Event: Cook with Star Chef Lucas Sin

By China Institute, Youtube, Jun 26, 2021

Junzi Kitchen’s Lucas Sin, one of New York’s most creative chefs and entertaining online personalities, shares stories of cooking as he demonstrates how to prepare the perfect Mapo Doufu (麻婆豆腐).

This is an exclusive program for China Institute members as part of our Food & Ideas Festival 2021, Click here to watch the video.

Western-Chinese food is authentic — and isn’t white washing our culture

by Kathryn Mannie, CBC, Jun 22, 2021

Dismissing this cuisine also dismisses the legacy of chefs like my grandparents.

“Sik jor fahn mei ah? Have you eaten yet?”

This common Cantonese greeting indicates just how closely Chinese culture associates food and well-being. My gung gung (maternal grandfather) fiercely proclaims that food and money are the two most important things to possess — in that order.

Like many second- and third-generation Chinese-Canadians, I was partially raised by my grandparents while my parents worked full time.

And at the centre of their home was the kitchen. Read more…

Though we can’t gather at our usual dim sum restaurant anymore, my family still gets together every Sunday around noon to share a meal. I join in virtually when I’m in Toronto. (Kathryn Mannie)