‘What Is Chinatown?’ Artist Jiawei Zhao Looks At Chinatown Under Lockdown

by Nadja Sayej, Apr 21 2020, Forbes

Jiawei Zhao is a Chinese artist based in New York City. As the country is under lockdown, Zhao uses familiar Chinese symbolism in his artwork to create a feeling of familiarity and comfort in this time of crisis.

The Brooklyn-based artist looks to Manhattan’s Chinatown, and the various Chinatowns across the country, as a point of inspiration for his artworks, be it his series that looks at the closed Chinese-language movie theatres, to his Wallpaper series, which reexamines historic public monuments and their relevancy in our current pandemic—looking back to see a clearer future, so to speak. read more…

Wallpaper #2 (ongoing) JIAWEI ZHAO

He’s probably been in more movies than any actor in history

By Trisha Gopal, Dominique Turner and David Yim, August 2, 2020, CNN

Hear more of James Hong’s Hollywood tales in the latest episode of Great Big Story, a new podcast by CNN about the delightful, surprising stories all around us.

James Hong is everywhere.

He spoke Mandarin with Keanu Reeves in “The Day the Earth Stood Still.” He backflipped his way out of a fight in “Wayne’s World 2.” He was the supportive, noodle-loving Mr. Ping in “Kung Fu Panda.” On television, he was the maître d’ in the episode of “Seinfeld” titled “The Chinese Restaurant.”
Without exaggeration, Hong might be the most prolific actor in Hollywood history. With more than 600 credits to his name, he may lay claim to the most credits of any actor, living or dead. …read more

With more than 600 acting credits, James Hong might be one of the most prolific actors in Hollywood history.

Anna May Wong Visits Shanghai, China

UCLA Film/TV Archive, Oct 12, 2017

Anna May Wong visits Shanghai, China on May 1, 1936. Stock footage shot for, but never used in, Hearst Metrotone news. Wong arrives on a Dollar Line boat, surrounded by a group of cameramen and newspapermen. She gets out of a car and enters Park Hotel. Wong visits the Star Motion Picture Studios, where she is met by Miss Butterfly Wu. Wong and Wu enter a motion picture set during filming. Wong visits the flower market.

Newsreel footage from UCLA Film & Television Archive’s Hearst Metrotone News Collection. This footage may be licensed for film, television and other productions. Learn more: ucla.in/2g6VNJx

© 2017 The Regents of the University of California

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Asian Americans Stan Lucy Liu Receiving Walk Of Fame Star Next To Anna May Wong’s

Kimberly Yam, HuffPost US, 05/02/2019

May’s Asian Pacific Heritage Month started off perfectly as Lucy Liu received her star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

And many Asians on the internet had no chill. Whatsoever.

The actress received her star on Wednesday, when it was placed next to the star for Asian American trailblazer Anna May Wong, who’s known as the first Chinese American movie star in Hollywood and will reportedly be featured in Liu’s upcoming series “Unsung Heroes.”

In her speech, Liu paid homage to Wong. She explained that Asians “have been making movies for a long time.” Read more…

Lucy Liu’s star will be placed near that of actress Anna May Wong, a Hollywood pioneer who found silent film success in the 1920s.

Charles Lam, NBC News, April 23, 2019

Actress Lucy Liu is finally getting a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Ana Martinez, producer of the Hollywood Walk of Fame, confirmed to NBC News that Liu’s star is scheduled to be unveiled May 1. The date is about three weeks before the premiere of the seventh and final season of CBS’ “Elementary,” which stars Liu.

The chamber of commerce first announced Liu’s induction in June 2018, without a ceremony date. Read more…

Lucy Liu, in 2016.

Disappearing Act: How Chinatowns in the US are being erased

Ty Lawson, China Global Television Network ,2018-06-04

A hunger strike is underway in New York City where people who were forced out of their crumbling Chinatown apartment building are protesting.

About 100 tenants were evacuated from their homes in January after a court-ordered inspection deemed the building uninhabitable. Other community members have joined them in their effort to return to their homes.

The tenants claim their landlord has let the building fall apart – so he could make repairs and then charge higher rent, in turn attracting more affluent residents. Read more…

How to Celebrate Chinese New Year in Honolulu Like You’re Really Chinese

DIANE LEE, 2018.02.05

Most people celebrate the new year on Jan. 1. My traditional Chinese family doesn’t officially celebrate the new year until February, when Chinese New Year rolls around (this year it falls on Feb. 16). As a second-generation Chinese-American, Chinese New Year is a huge deal for my family. It’s right up there with celebrating a birthday, wedding or anniversary. This monthlong celebration takes a lot of planning and preparation. Expect to go grocery shopping, cook Chinese dishes and clean house to usher in a healthy, prosperous new year. Read more…

PHOTO: THINKSTOCK

City of Vancouver formally apologizes to Chinese community for past discrimination

Chad Pawson, CBC News, Apr 22, 2018

The City of Vancouver formally apologized to Chinese Canadians on Sunday for past legislation, regulations and policies that discriminated against them.
“This is an important day for council and all Vancouverites to come together and recognize historical wrongdoings committed against Chinese people and to build a better future together,” said Mayor Gregor Robertson in a written statement.
An audience of 500 people witnessed the ceremony at the Chinese Cultural Centre, which was also broadcast on a screen along Keefer Street in the city’s Chinatown. Read more…

Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson along with city councillors pose with the official apology offered to redress historical discrimination against Chinese residents. (City of Vancouver/Twitter)